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Cornered Tiger's Debut Show: Is Cricket Racist? is shortlisted for a Broadcast Sport Award!

We are so thrilled to announce that our debut commission: Is Cricket Racist? has been shortlisted for a @broadcast_sport Award! – Best Sports Documentary of the Year (up to 60 mins). We’re so pleased for the entire team and especially Masood Khan, the director. We would like to dedicate this nomination to all the contributors and victims of racism in the game. We hope the documentary continues to highlight the challenges faced and helps bring meaningful and much needed change. If you have a burning idea for a documentary, we’d love to hear from you.

 Is Cricket Racist? is still available to watch here#BSportAwards23

IS CRICKET RACIST? RECEIVES 4 STARS IN THE GUARDIAN

Is Cricket Racist? aired on Tuesday 18th July, as well as delivering an important message about racism within the game, is has begun to receive praise from viewers and newspapers alike. ​​

Not long after it’s airing, The Guardian released their 4 star review, written by Leila Latif. Leila states: ‘This programme sees the actor and presenter Adil Ray investigate a troubled time for cricket… Ray covers the fallout, his personal experiences as a fan and the historic institutional biases in the sport. But even in light of the recent report and media coverage, the documentary is genuinely shocking.’ And: ‘The programme documents a staggering level of institutional racism.’ As well as: ‘Ultimately, when the programme speaks to (Azeem) Rafiq, he is correct when he says he has been “vindicated”. He also states the obvious, that the onus cannot be on the players of colour to fix the system that has abused them…’​

Is Cricket Racist? is still available to watch here

IS CRICKET RACIST? IS PICK OF THE WEEK IN:
THE SUN, THE GUARDIAN & TOP 10 BEST SHOWS TO WATCH IN INDEPENDENT, AMONG OTHERS.

Is Cricket Racist? aired and with critical acclaim on Tuesday 18th July.

The Sun included Is Cricket Racist? in it’s TV Picks of the week and says ‘… Adil Ray who has followed the story from the beginning, examines the problem and asks if cricket’s governing bodies are ready and willing to make changes.’

In The Guardian, Is Cricket Racist? had a top billingThe Guardian describing: ‘Adil Ray does a thorough audit, speaking to former Pakistan captain Imran Khan, England international Moeen Ali and Tanni Grey-Thompson… Sobering, but part of a conversation that is long overdue.’ And The Independent selects Is Cricket Racist? as one of it’s Top 10 Shows to Watch this week, citing: ‘Adil Ray goes inside the cricket world to investigate, hearing stories of racist locker-room “banter” and active abuse that warrants serious consideration from authorities.”​​

Is Cricket Racist? is still available to watch here

CORNERED TIGER’S DEBUT DOCUMENTARY TO AIR
TUESDAY 18TH JULY, 11PM ON CHANNEL 4:

IS CRICKET RACIST?

Azeem Rafiq’s revelations about the racism he faced as a player at Yorkshire County Cricket Club became a national scandal with some of the worst cases of racism ever witnessed in British sport. Adil Ray has been following the story for over a year and examines whether racism is endemic in the game, speaking to those who have often gone unheard.

The Independent Commission for Equity in Cricket report has been damning but as Adil finds to many this is nothing new. Former Pakistan cricket captain Imran Khan talks about the racism he endured playing cricket in England which he also termed apartheid and how the problem has “now fused with Islamophobia”. While current England player, Moeen Ali, one of a handful of South Asians to have played for his country, talks about the racism he has faced including a tweet from Ashes winning captain Michael Vaughan which suggested Moeen should hunt down terrorists. Moeen has a message for the former captain. Speaking to Tanni Grey Thompson, the acting chair of Yorkshire, Adil asks if the former players found guilty of racism will be welcomed back and how the club intends to move forward.

And with the ICEC report highlighting issues around elitism and class, Adil asks if the sport and the governing bodies are seriously ready to make significant change.